Thought for the Day – August 3rd, 2013

08-03

Locke, John. Two Treatises on Government. London, England. 1689. Book I, Chap 4, Sections 23
SEE: http://bit.ly/18OXnoz
SEE ALSO: http://books.google.com/books?id=K5UIAAAAQAAJ
SEE ALSO: http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/LocTre2.html
WEB PRESENCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Locke
WEB PRESENCE: http://www.johnlocke.net/
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COMPARE: “…that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” (Preamble to the U.S. Declaration of Independence, 1776)

NOTE: “English has changed since the founders of the United States used unalienable in the signed final draft of their 1776 Declaration of Independence (some earlier drafts and later copies have inalienable). Inalienable, which means exactly the same thing—both mean incapable of being transferred to another or others—is now the preferred form. Unalienable mainly appears in quotes of or references to the Declaration. Inalienable prevails everywhere else.” See: http://grammarist.com/usage/inalienable-unalienable/

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